IWLA Economics of Warehousing & 3PL Sales Course Recap

 Attendees break into groups to review materials presented to this point, to ask speakers questions and/or discuss materials with other attendees. Starting clockwise with Melvin Kerr from Warehouse and Logistics Las Vegas (red shirt), Steve Kloos from Keller Warehousing, Ty Gilliam from Kelller Warehousing and Michelle Middleton, from Ohio Logistics-Findlay's Timber.

Attendees break into groups to review materials presented to this point, to ask speakers questions and/or discuss materials with other attendees. Starting clockwise with Melvin Kerr from Warehouse and Logistics Las Vegas (red shirt), Steve Kloos from Keller Warehousing, Ty Gilliam from Kelller Warehousing and Michelle Middleton, from Ohio Logistics-Findlay’s Timber.

The 2014 IWLA Economics of Warehousing & 3PL Sales Course in Orlando, Fla., was a great success. From the questions and engaging (and often boisterous) discussions it was apparent that this course contained the content attendees sought. Many participants expressed eagerness by the end of the course to get back so that the knowledge can be applied in their warehouses.

IWLA divided the course in two areas of the warehouse logistics industry—cost assessment and sales. Course faculty led discussions that helped members:

  • Identify costs related to logistics operations and how to allocate them across storage, handling and administrative lines.
  • Understand the components included in rate development.
  • Explain the subtleties of different rate making types. (e.g., public or contract)
  • Understand key terms used in rate making.
  • Analyze strategies for rate development while selecting those most appropriate to each specific RFP.
  • Participate in interactive application of rating principles.
  • Understand a flow chart of the finished process.
  • Develop your own methodology for rate making in a format to take back to your workplace.

These are among the sales course highlights:

  • Applying knowledge through case studies and group work on strategies to increase margins based on the unique storage, capacity, and handling characteristics of the product.
  • Approaching your market through playing up on your strengths, understanding your competition, appealing to your target customers, and using market trends to understand their needs.
  • Understanding sales strategies through lead generation and database management, finding and qualifying leads, strengthening relationships, and identifying the top client needs and designing solutions to meet those needs.

Finally, the group wrapped the course up with strategic roundtable discussions on the best practices from the sales and pricing sides of the equation.

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